Sailfish OS now supports HERE’s mapping and positioning technology. Jolla announced an agreement to license positioning services and map technology from HERE, a Nokia business, to be used in Sailfish OS. This will provide users with up-to-date map data and rich location information, such as restaurants and hotels, from over 190 countries around the world.

Enabling fast and accurate retrieval of positioning information anywhere in the world, these services are essential for any mobile maps experience. A global map and location content offering also brings Jolla one step closer to achieving a fully equipped mobile operating system. The mapping asset is an integral part of Jolla’s complete user experience.

“We are excited that HERE is providing its leading positioning services for Sailfish OS and that our maps application will be powered by HERE cloud services. This will help us deliver the optimal mobile maps experience to our customers,” says Jolla CEO, Tomi Pienimäki.

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Jolla has fixed some small issues and the Jolla Harbour has been relaunched today. Dry dock and slipway for Jolla developers – Jolla Harbour is home for developers with all the engineering tools needed to launch apps to Jolla Store.

At the moment it only supports free applications but Jolla has been working hard on adding support for commercial applications in near future.

If you are developing apps for Sailfish OS, simply go to https://harbour.jolla.com/ and be ready for the upcoming launch of the Jolla phone!

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It looks that what’s been done to Symbian and MeeGo so far still isn’t enough for those who destructed Nokia’s own operating systems and the company itself.

Now, starting from January 1st, they’re cancelling support for Symbian and Harmattan applications in the Nokia Store. A message stating so has just been sent to all Nokia Store publishers. The existing content will remain available, but neither new applications nor even updates to the existing ones will be accepted. They are going to focus SOLELY on Windows Phone and the Asha series, i.e. only on what they sold to Microsoft.

It looks that Nokia continues to do EVERYTHING it takes to support Microsoft, even if it is harmful to Nokia itself. Or else, what other company (especially in THIS financial condition) would be just giving up like this on yet another revenue source, and probably quite a good one considering that only in September Symbian and Harmattan users have downloaded nearly 700 copies of my applications (and I surely am NOT the most popular Ovi store publisher), which shows that there is an ongoing demand for Symbian and MeeGo software.

And it makes me wonder what has happened with Nokia’s PROMISE to support Symbian until 2016. A company that doesn’t keep their own promises should get what it deserves, and I hope that Symbian and Harmattan users will not forget how they’ve been cheated and misled.

Hopefully by that time someone else will decide to launch a ’3rd party’ appstore supporting Symbian and Harmattan.

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In the light of the recent news about Nokia and Microsoft, those who remained loyal to Symbian have created a PETITION to Nokia and Microsoft, calling them to release full source code, including the latest builds, and make it fully open source to preserve the platform and let the community go on with it. The petition has quickly reached over 2,500 signatures, and counting.

If you still care about Symbian OS, please sign the petition here.

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EasyStreetView is a Google Maps client focused on, and optimized for, quick StreetView access and usage. You don’t have to switch back and forth between the map and the street view, no need to drag and drop the Pegman, either. Both the map and street view are shown on one screen. Simply enter an address, then just tap on a street/place you want to see and that’s it – a marker will be shown on the map and street view will be displayed. The map and street view are integrated with each other – you can switch to a different street/place anytime just by tapping on different area on the map and street view will change instantly. As you move on the street view, the marker moves on the map, too, always showing you the current, exact location. The map and street view can be zoomed in/out and panned independently.

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ISSTracker for Symbian Anna & Belle (also available for MeeGo Harmattan) tracks satellites and predicts their visible passes over your location. It supports ISS (International Space Station), Hubble Space Telescope, and any other satellite listed at CelesTrak.com defined by the user. ISSTracker automatically downloads current orbit data (TLE) and shows realtime-updated satellite location now and within the next hour on a Nokia Map (street, terrain, satellite) zoomable from world map to street level. Prediction of visible passes includes appearance and departure times and azimuths, visibility duration and highest elevation. Supports both GPS and manually entered coordinates.

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GeoCoder lets you quickly find any location and get LOTS of information about it, which would otherwise require browsing multiple resources. For any place / address / coordinates / map position or for the current location you’ll get: its exact address and postcode, exact elevation, road distance and travel time (for driving, bicycling or walking), sunrise/sunset times and day length, dusk/dawn times and daylight duration, moonrise/moonset times, timezone/DST information, current weather and 7-day weather prediction, 360° panorama of the exact location, Nokia Map and fullscreen Google Map with Street View, related Wikipedia entry, and more – all that with one tap.

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I’ve just finished porting MoonCalc Pro and Biorhythms from MeeGo/Symbian to BlackBerry 10 (Z10) and got them approved by RIM for distribution in the AppWorld store. The remaining applications will be released for the Z10 within the next two weeks, followed by Sailfish OS versions for the upcoming Jolla smartphones.

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It’s almost frightening how quickly technology develops these days. It doesn’t seem like too long ago that phones were simple, making calls and sending texts. Now, we have phones that are essentially full computers, with full access to the internet and all its features; video calling, music sharing, maps, everything.

It’s quite fantastic really, knowing that you have full connectivity anywhere; that millions of pages of information are at your fingertips wherever you go and you’re never cut off from the world around you. The problem is that this applies to everyone that has a mobile phone, even your children. It means they can access the internet and all its videos, social media and app stores wherever they are, away from the protection of the family home and your watchful eye.

Some parents worry about what their children get up to on the internet, and that’s only natural. There are many opportunities for mischief on the internet and some all too well known dangers too. Some parents might have already had something of a close shave or seen some warning signs, and want to prevent things from getting out of hand.

Luckily, mobile phone developers have kept up with parental pleas and included control features so parents can determine what features a child can access on their mobile – the best of these being the Parental Control app on Blackberry.

What is Parental Controls?

Parental Controls is a Blackberry app that allows you to disable or edit certain features on your child’s phone. It is available for download from the BlackBerry® App World for any users on BlackBerry® 6 or BlackBerry® 7, and a version for BlackBerry® 5 should be available very soon. Those of you that purchased your phones after Summer 2012 should already have the application on your devices, so won’t need to download it yourself.

How Parental Controls can give you peace of mind

The Parental Controls application gives you an array of options, allowing you to disable certain features entirely or just to edit or limit a feature. It doesn’t only cover internet access and apps, but the phone’s own calling and messaging features as well, and even the camera. Editable features include:
Phone Calls: using this option you can enable or disable calls to the phone. You can also limit incoming calls only to contacts stored to the phone, meaning you child won’t receive calls from anyone unknown.
Text Messages: enable or disable text messages.
Bluetooth: enable or disable direct file transfers from phone to phone over Bluetooth – your children and their friends might use this to share photos.
Location Services: use this feature to turn the phone GPS feature either off or on. This feature can show your child’s location if used with certain apps, but is also needs to be on if they want directions to a destination from their location on Google Maps.
Browser: enable or disable internet access via the phone’s web browser.
Youtube Uploader: decide whether or not your child can upload videos straight from their phone to Youtube.
Application installation: this might come in useful if your child is spending too much on apps. You can use this to disable the ability to download new apps to the phone.
Email accounts: enable or disable the addition of new email accounts to the phone.
Facebook and Twitter: enable or disable access to these two social media applications on your child’s phone.
Camera: enable or disable the camera from use.
Blackberry Messenger: allow or prohibit access to the Blackberry Messenger application.
Once your chosen settings are in place, these are locked with a four number PIN to ensure your child can’t interfere with your settings. You can then allow your child to use their phone with complete peace of mind.

More information on Blackberry Parental Controls can be downloaded from the Vodafone website. There’s also plenty of good information and discussion available to read on the Blackberry blogs.

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Tablet and mobile phones are the latest devices to be widely used by consumers. Of these perhaps the most recognizable tablet is the iPad and the iPhone is the most recognizable mobile phone. While many assume that the iPad is just a larger version of the iPhone, it is in fact not. Both devices, while sharing some of Apple’s trademark technology, present some differences that affect certain activities. Among this would be gaming which has become quite popular on both devices.

When comparing the iPad and the iPhone in regards to how they perform for gaming at online casinos, size is of course the first thing one notices. The latest iPhone 5, has a display size of 4 inches in comparison to the iPad which is 9.7 inches. For those who are avid gamers, the iPad is the much better choice for gaming. While both devices do have the patented retina displays, the reduced resolution does affect gaming. Also, the hardware found within the iPad is much more powerful in comparison to the iPhone. When using the devices to play online casino games, the iPad users have found much more satisfaction.
Once you’ve made a selection between a mobile phone or a tablet, there are many casino games that can be enjoyed. You might consider the table game of baccarat. Baccarat is one of the oldest card games that once was enjoyed mainly be rich gamblers. Of course with online casinos like Lucky Nugget, this has changed. Baccarat is now much more accessible so many people have learned how to play this casino game. Players bet on which hand, the dealer or the player, will have a value closest to nine. The online version shows two hands being dealt. Only two cards are dealt however, there are some versions or special rules that do allow a third card to be dealt under special circumstances.

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